Posts Tagged ‘business’

Resume Fabrication

Recently, Yahoo! CEO Scott Thompson’s incorrect resume caught the tech world by storm. What did he do wrong?

According to his resume he has a computer science degree. Whoops, he doesn’t, even though that detail was included in an SEC filing and in several public bios. Walk that one back why don’t ya.

This week at Sarah Lawrence College students are preparing to walk at commencement and then off into the working world. On their resumes are internships, part time jobs and various skill sets that will hopefully help them find a job so they can begin paying off their student loans, buy dinner, and do something fun with their friends.

At a large company like Yahoo! one might think that this kind of thing wouldn’t happen… Ever!

What does this mean for the recent graduate who may have been manipulating their online presence during the time as an under-grad. Is that even possible? Better yet, will an employer care?

Recent graduates are not expected to have years worth of job history on their resume. It is a foot in the door that will help them sell their amazing skills. Some fields require extensive proof of training but at a liberal arts institution the sky is the limit and you never know what you’re going to see on someone’s resume.

Do students manipulate their resume to stand out? Is someone going to check to see if everything on the resume is true?

I think I’ll end with a bigger question, are resume’s becoming a thing of the past due to social media and online reputation options?

YouTube Partnerships for Everyone Inside and Outside the Classroom!

In the classroom students are taught a number of things. One of those things is to think on their own. Another is to create content. Often times it is for a class assignment. Often those projects inspire future ideas. It’s exactly what the education setting should be doing.

What happens when students gets inspired, talks to a friend who then talks to another friend which leads them to an ongoing YouTube series? My reaction is to call it like I see it, success! Students taking what they’re learning, collaborating, using a variety of technologies for a creative project is going to help them in the short and long term. I tip my hat to all of these intrepid creatives.

Looking around us it’s obvious that this has been happening around the world for years but YouTube just did something that will change the landscape for ever – everyone can make money on videos they upload. That’s right – everyone.

Hers is the official announcement  – http://youtubecreator.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/being-youtube-creator-just-got-even.html

What does this mean for schools?

Well, at first glance it shouldn’t mean much but if we look a little deeper we might find some gaps in the classroom and in the student handbook.

In the classroom

Students are taught how to work in the known business world and a few schools see an opportunity to teach social media in Communication schools but what seems to be missing is the recognition that these pieces are not one thing or another. Social media is a business just like in-person networking events and office environments.

How many faculty have been successful with the use of these tools?

Dare I step back another step to ask, how many faculty are even using these tools?

This push by YouTube is going to have a mega-impact on entertainment, education and any other form of visual experience. Who is going to teach this to the next generation of students?

In the handbook

At Sarah Lawrence College the 2011-2012 Student Handbook states the following about “Computer and Network Acceptable Use.”

Acceptable Behavior

… In general, any uses of Sarah Lawrence College’s computer facilities that infringe on another individual’s right to privacy, adversely affect the user community, or are not allowed under the terms of our software licenses are prohibited.

  • commercial activities, such as development of software for sale, work undertaken to support any company, or other contracted work

Note: I’m not a lawyer, my interpretation of the policy topic is meant to be an exercise only. All of these bullets consider  that monetization enabled.

  • If a student creates a video for someone who will then post the content to YouTube
  • A student creates a video in their room and posts it to YouTube
  • A class project is purchased by Funny or Die and is sent via the campus network

Is the student breaking the school policy and even if they are, who is going to enforce it and how could it be enforced?

In the past commercial activities were relatively easy to separate from a ‘regular’ daily life. Over the past 8 years that has changed significantly. Yesterday, YouTube shattered the glass ceiling.

The question “How can I make money on YouTube?” is answered with 3 words, upload a video.

My questions for you, dear reader…

  • What are other schools doing to address the social media issue and how it has become a new financial model for, quite literally anyone?
  • Are faculty required to use at least one social media site?
  • Are schools willing to have the discussion of the social media landscape in the classroom?
  • Is your school so strict that it’s trying to force these tools into only one school of thought vs. many or all?

Please ask your questions below and rip apart my policy game exploration. I may have zero ground to stand on, then again it might be time for schools to reconsider their network policies.